Triple R
Selection 2
Trapez
2004
B



coming off what could be considered one of Kompakt’s finest mix moments, Riley Reinhold returns to recording with Selection 2, a mix that highlights the best of the Trapez label. Working under the constraints of having one catalogue’s material available, Reinhold should scarcely be given any points for doing so for one major reason: it’s his own label (run with Jacqueline Klein). So, with little need to immerse himself in the back catalogue, Reinhold has obvious advantages over most producers that might’ve taken up the task. It, of course, helps that a frightening level of consistency has been shown by the label in the recent past, matched perhaps only by the Kompakt and Areal labels, making the material available to mix almost too much to narrow.

Despite this mountain of material to sort through, Triple R does so expertly. The mix begins with Donnacha Costello’s Pleite pseudonym issuing a self titled track that is a serviceable House track, featuring a clicky backing track that skips along underneath the pounding bass. For this, and the next few tracks, the mix is a steady diet of airy Microhouse tunes that play off one another quite nicely, seguing easily and slipping past relatively unremarkably, save Akufen’s “Pschometry 2.1” and its memorable micro-sampling.

It’s in the hands of the uncredited artist responsible for “Ltd. 3” that the mix begins to make a left turn into something harder and funkier. Utilizing a much fatter bassline than song’s past, the track reaches mouth agape status when the main melody emerges, sounding vaguely like a theremin. It’s a nice surprise, but it doesn’t register for long, as the song soon dissolves into Jeremy P. Caulfield’s “Ripped Backsides”. The mix, as with others, is seamless and first highlights the cracking rhythm that, once again, amazes because of its similarity to a frog’s ribit. No time to rest and take it in (which is sort of the point here): it is soon overtaken by the immense, all encompassing first major climax of the mix: Oliver Hacke’s “Vampir Von Dusseldorf”. In true vampiric nature, the track sucks in everything around it, exuding its intensity through a massive bassline and the unlabeled sound that has been peppering tracks like “Mushroom” from Superpitcher and others (the one that sounds vaguely like raindrops being sucked back up into the air).

The second major climactic track is M.I.A.’s “River”, which serves as the beginning of the end. Its brooding and searching bass melody is as undeniable as any on this mix, sounding similar to Ada’s “Drums”. The last major track of note is the Steve Bug Mix of Jeff Samuel’s “Knob”. Serving as the closer to the mix, the song is a soothing come down from the previous hour’s mostly banging proceedings.

Acting as a sort of analogue to Michael Mayer’s own Speicher mix, Selection 2 finds Reinhold mining a particular self-imposed set of sounds for a mix of surprising rhythmic intensity. This is one for the dancefloor, make no mistake, one that fills the skeleton of what most Microhouse ends up being and filling it out with an insistent pulse that can scarcely be denied. Along with Tom Middleton’s The Trip, this is easily one of the best mixes of the new year.
Reviewed by: Todd Burns
Reviewed on: 2004-04-02
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