Dino Felipe
Dino Felipe As Flim Toby
Schematic
2002
C-



dino Felipe Delavega is Flim Toby and Flim Toby is Dino Felipe Delavega. Dino Felipe Delavega first introduced this alter ego, Flim Toby, on a limited edition cassette release on the American Tapes label in 2001. The tape found its way to the Schematic label offices in Miami and Dino Felipe Delavega soon became Dino Felipe, Schematic recording artist.


On this, the debut release for the label, Dino Felipe charts a territory very similar to many other Schematic artists. Using the clicks and glitches of the microsound movement as a rhythmic backdrop on nearly every track, Felipe seemingly paints himself into a corner. It is the foreground of the songs, however, that allow Felipe to use the trappings of electronic glitches to make up a whole that is largely more satisfying than many of his label mates recent releases.


Starting from the musique concrete backdrop of the opening song, “Actipau”, Felipe bounces from microgenre to microgenre in constructing this 24 song album. No song reaches significantly over four minutes, allowing Felipe to explore, in short, many different variations and ideas on the release. “Dolipon” sounds as if it was lifted directly from Mouse on Mars’ Niun Niggung album, while “Sick Later, Good Now” reminds of Richard Devine’s Aleamapper. Among the songs that remind of other artists, though, there are definite highlights that show that Felipe may be able to carve a distinctive niche for himself in the coming years.


“Me And You” has a stilted funk rhythm aided by a two note keyboard melody and random electronic noises. In the piece Felipe mixes and matches the elements that make up the song to a satisfying conclusion in less that two and a half minutes. On “Wubber”, ringing tones and a march-like drum beat fill the track to a breaking point, at which Felipe cuts the track off abruptly at just over two minutes in. The tracks are of high interest, most likely, because they are so short and demand replay. Taking those two minutes to run one idea into the ground, it seems that Felipe doesn’t know how to add a second part to a song, however.


The song length is, for the most part, very short and makes a cohesive listening experience nearly impossible. Rather, it is more like Dino Felipe has constructed a montage of scenes that can be played at random- or skipped. This would make sense, as Dino Felipe claims that Flim Toby is a “scrambled up film in the shape of a person”. While this interpretation explains the relative disjunctiveness of the release, it makes for a rather hard listen. On concentrated listening it becomes clear that this scrambled up film is full of ideas (sometimes highly interesting and sometimes very boring), none of which seem to be fully explored in any detail. While this may be the first step in attempting to form a introspective, maybe even autobiographical, glitch movement, Dino Felipe’s debut effort seems much more like a bad Hollywood movie, really, with it's expanse of interesting ideas left unexplored. And who wants to watch those?


Reviewed by: Todd Burns
Reviewed on: 2003-09-01
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